Friday, April 9, 2010

Farm Animals.....Not Always Pets

Being a farm vet you get to see the many types of behavior that different species, and animals within each species, display. Some of these animals never become quite like a "pet" as some people would imagine, even if they see humans on a regular basis. Therefore, different tools to help restrain animals are used when the vet needs to check an animal. One of those tools are called stanchions. The majority of dairy farms you see in this area will have stanchions in the feed lane so when the cows eat, they have the ability to lock and keep them there for managerial purposes without causing any stress or harm to the animals. This gives the vet and dairy farmer a good, up-close look at the whole animal. Here is a good picture of some cows in stanchions in the feed lane.


Another tool used on beef cattle ranches are squeeze chute. In some cases free-range cattle have not been near humans for quite some time so a chute is used to enclose the full body in order to keep the animal and humans handling it safe. Here is a photo of the farm vet with the cow in a chute in order to perform the c-section.


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6 comments:

  1. Stanchions, head catches, and chutes are essential to let a large animal veterinarian examine and treat animals properly. You have done a great job explaining that this allows the animals to receive veterinary care without injury to themselves or the people trying to help them.

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  2. Thanks Kathy! We always appreciate your feedback!

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  3. Did i read somewhere that the squeeze chute actually produces endorphins which calm the animal? It was a long time ago when i was researching the use of twitches on horses...

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  4. A correctly applied twitch to a horses nose will lead to the release of endorphins, calming a nervous horse. I am not sure if the same effect is observed when using a squeeze chute in cattle. Most cattle chutes apply pressure to the flanks and restraint at the neck minimizing movement that may cause harm to the cow or people. Chutes and lead-ups are designed around a cows behaviour/flight patterns. A well planned chute, in my experience, is what will keep them calm.

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  5. Great Blog!! That was amazing. Your thought processing is wonderful. The way you tell the thing is awesome. You are really a master
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  6. Thank you for stopping by "plastic stanchions"!

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